Category: London

[before-after]

london-then-and-now

london-then-and-now

The market began in 1656 when the Duke of Bedford allowed several temporary stalls to be built in the gardens of Bedford House, his London home.

In the 1650s, the first pineapples were grown in England, and so popular did they become that they were adopted as the symbol of the market. The Duke subsequently sold the market licence, and by 1700 there was a regular thrice-weekly market selling fruit, vegetables, flowers, roots and herbs. In 1748, the market was rebuilt by the Duke, and the tone of the market was raised considerably. The area around Covent Garden became synonymous with theatre and opera. The current colourful market building, full of light and space, was designed by Charles Fowler and built in 1828. In 1974, the market moved to a new site at Nine Elms in Battersea called New Covent Garden, but the original site has now been redeveloped into a thriving market once more, with a variety of shops.

Read

[before-after]

london-then-and-now

london-then-and-now

Young’s Corner is where Chiswick ends and Hammersmith begins, and historically, it is where Middlesex ended and London began – and there really was a Mr Young, who leased a shop on the site in the mid-19th century.

Chiswick High Road, the main shopping street, runs west to east all the way through Chiswick. It starts at Chiswick Roundabout and runs east as far as the Goldhawk Road junction, known as Young’s Corner, which is visible in the photographs with its distinctive pointed tower. The old photograph shows the original building of Young’s Corner, but the new photograph shows that part of the façade has, unfortunately, been replaced with unattractive concrete.

Read

[before-after]

london-then-and-now

 

london-then-and-now

Brompton Road lies partly in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea and partly in
the City of Westminster.

It starts from Knightsbridge underground station and runs south-west through a very wealthy area until it reaches South Kensington underground station. There are five-star hotels and many top restaurants and shops along the road. One of the most famous department stores in the world, Harrods, appears in the middle of the photographs, with its characteristic dome. Harrods was founded by (sometimes convicted criminal) Charles Henry Harrod at Borough High Street in 1824. It subsequently moved to Brompton Road in 1849. Harrods became a public company in 1889, and by the 1890s it had established a bank and estate agency. Harrods had some of the world’s first-ever escalators, installed in 1898. In 1959, the high street department store group House of Fraser bought Harrods. In 1985, the store returned to private ownership when Egyptian-born Mohamed Al Fayed and his brother Ali bought House of Fraser for £615m. In 2010, Al Fayed sold Harrods to the Qatari royal family for a reported £1.5 billion.

Read

[before-after]

london-then-and-now

london-then-and-now

Camden High Street is a one-way street in north London on the route from central London to Hampstead. Here is Camden Town Junction, also known as Britannia Junction, in the middle of Camden Town, where six roads converge.

The World’s End is a pub and music venue on the corner of Camden Road and Camden High Street. There has been a pub or tavern on the site since at least the late 17th century. The pub was previously known variously as the Mother Red Cap, the Mother Black Cap and also the Black Cap, and it was renamed the World’s End in 1985. This may be just as well: the black cap was worn by a judge when sentencing a defendant to death. There are various horrible local legends about this pub, and of course, it is supposed to be haunted.

Read

[before-after]

london-then-and-now

london-then-and-now

Bow Road forms part of the A11, connecting Mile End Road to the A12 and Stratford.

The clock tower building visible in the old photograph was part of St Clement’s Hospital (which was open from 1874 to 2005), a mental health hospital. The building has now been turned into residential flats. The CS3 cycle superhighway is visible in the modern photograph on both sides of the road. It begins in Barking in east London and ends at Lancaster Gate in west London.

Read

[before-after]

london-before-after

Regent’s Park Now

I am glad to share with you Regent’s Park then and now. One of London’s Royal Parks Regent’s Park covers 410 acres.
Like some other royal parks, it was originally a hunting ground for King Henry Vlll. He famously hunted for wives, but he liked hunting deer as well. Only in 1835 did Regent’s Park open to the public.

It is roughly circular in shape. It has an outer ring road (the “Outer Circle”) and inner ring road (the “Inner Circle”) for vehicles and pedestrians. The Outer Circle is popular for cycling, especially in the morning before 7 a.m., when the park gates open for vehicle traffic. The Inner Circle is a popular resting place for cabbies.

https://www.royalparks.org.uk/parks/the-regents-park

The park is always busy because there are so many things to visit here, including London Zoo (opened 1828), the Open Air Theatre (opened 1932), Queen Mary’s Garden (London’s largest rose collection, opened 1934), Winfield House (since 1955 it has been the official residence of the United States Ambassador), Sussex Palace (main campus of the London Business School since 1970), London Central Mosque (built 1977), Regent’s University (built 1911), a lake and Regent’s Canal. The renowned and beautiful early 19th-century “Nash Terraces” (designed by prominent architect John Nash) surround the Park.

All in all, there is a very interesting selection of architecture. If you enter Regent’s Park from the south, near Baker Street, you are in central London, and if you walk all the way north to the northern boundary, Prince Albert Road, you find yourself in north London, and the character is different. Regent’s Park thus constitutes a peaceful and charming gateway in either direction.

Read

[before-after]

london-before-after

london-before-after

I am happy to present Broadway Market-Hackney then and now. Small market in East London but with a big atmosphere. Pubs, restaurants, stalls, live independent performers. Has it all. Grab a bite and chill next to the canal. Broadway Market is a street in the London Borough of Hackney. This street connects London Fields with the Regent’s Canal. Broadway Market is home to market traders since the 1890s. Broadway Market-Hackney Then and Now you can see a unique mixture of tastes and cultures. In 2004, a Saturday food market was launched, and it is firmly established. Around 130 stalls selling everything from meat, fish, cheeses, pastry. You can also find amazing street food and coffee, vintage clothing, and fashion from local designers and artists. Broadway Market is one of the go-to places for food and vintage lovers. Artwords (22 Broadway Market) has a great selection of rare fashion and inspiring books, while MacBlack & Vine (47 Broadway Market) sells vintage furniture and wine.

Other attractions include the National Trust-owned Sutton House. A rare example of a Tudor red-brick house built for the Principal Secretary of State for Henry VIII. Hackney is also home to the Hackney Empire theatre and Stoke Newington Church Street with its eclectic array of specialist shops, cafes, and ethnic restaurants.

OPENING TIMES:

The street and schoolyard markets open every Saturday between 9 am and 5 pm. Get there earlier – not long after 9 am – before it gets busy. Arriving at around 4pm isn’t advised because many of the stallholders have a tendency to start packing up early. Shops, bars, and restaurants are open throughout the week.

TRAVELLING:

Broadway Market’s nearest Tube station is London Fields on the Overground line.

Read

[before-after]

london-before-after

london-before-after

This is a view of Brixton Road at the junction with Acre Lane and Coldharbour Lane. Brixton Road is in the London Borough of Lambeth, running from the Oval to Brixton.
On the left side of the old photograph at the corner of Brixton Road and Acre Lane, the Isaac Walton clothing store is visible, but in the new photograph, it has been replaced with a branch of McDonald’s. Mid-left, you can see two railway bridges crossing Brixton Road – these serve National Rail.
Read

 

[before-after]

london-before-after

london-before-after

Charing Cross is a junction in central London where six routes meet. The name Charing Cross derives from the old English word charing, meaning a bend in the river. The original Charing Cross was one of the medieval Eleanor crosses that stood here in the heart of the hamlet of Charing.

Charing Cross is famous for its second-hand bookshops. Book stores are located between Leicester Square Underground station and Cambridge Circus. You also can find more general second-hand and antiquarian shops. Here are a few of them – Quinto Bookshop, Henry Pordes, and Any Amount of Books.

On the right side of the photographs, you can see The New Grand Hotel Charing Cross, London 1880. The hotel is located at the corner of Strand and Northumberland Avenue. The Grand Hotel at Charing Cross was closed in October 1968 to make way for the new inner-city ring road.

Charles I monument is one of the finest statues in the area. The statue was erected in 1633 and is especially pertinent to the Charing Cross area as it sits on the original location of the Eleanor cross. You will find a Blue Plaque here marking the Eleanor cross. You will want to pay a visit to this site to get a full history of this fascinating area.

What to do in Charing Cross?

Charing Cross can feel a bit like a tourist hub. Tourists and Londoners milling around the millions of bus stops that surround the already packed Trafalgar Square. But, please, don’t let that scare you off. There’s a lot of secret stuff available in the area where you can build some lasting memories. You can find something special for everyone here.  Charing Cross Theatre is one of those places.

Things to Do near Charing Cross Station

Read

[before-after]

london-before-after

Buckingham Palace Then and Now presented in the images above. George III bought Buckingham House in 1761 for his wife Queen Charlotte to use as a comfortable family home. Buckingham Palace Then and Now has been the official London residence of the monarch since the reign of Queen Victoria in the 19th century. Still, it is one of the most famous landmarks in the world. The land is located in the borough of London known as Westminster. Buckingham Palace hosts functions and ceremonies regularly. For instance, in 1851 Queen Victoria made her first public appearance on the balcony.

There is a visible difference between past and present. The difference is fascinating and represents the changing face of the monarchy. One hundred years ago, powerful monarchies were simply a fact of life. Meaning that nobody needed to visit Britain to see a royal family.

During most of the year, Buckingham Palace is the office and London residence of The Queen. But since 1993, during the summer months, the palace is open to the public. Visitors can walk around 19 magnificent State Rooms.

Explore Buckingham Palace Garden with unprecedented freedom this summer, and discover for yourself for the very first time its sights before enjoying a unique, once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to picnic with views of the Palace.

You will be free to wander around the garden’s winding paths at your own pace and experience the beauty and calm of this walled oasis in central London. Among the many features to discover are the 156-meter Herbaceous Border, the Horse Chestnut Avenue, the Plane trees planted by Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, and the famous lake with its island that is home to the Buckingham Palace bees.

You can check out more Locations in my Gallery.

 

Read