Category: East

[before-after]

london-before-after

london-before-after

I am happy to present Broadway Market-Hackney then and now. Small market in East London but with a big atmosphere. Pubs, restaurants, stalls, live independent performers. Has it all. Grab a bite and chill next to the canal. Broadway Market is a street in the London Borough of Hackney. This street connects London Fields with the Regent’s Canal. Broadway Market is home to market traders since the 1890s. Broadway Market-Hackney Then and Now you can see a unique mixture of tastes and cultures. In 2004, a Saturday food market was launched, and it is firmly established. Around 130 stalls selling everything from meat, fish, cheeses, pastry. You can also find amazing street food and coffee, vintage clothing, and fashion from local designers and artists. Broadway Market is one of the go-to places for food and vintage lovers. Artwords (22 Broadway Market) has a great selection of rare fashion and inspiring books, while MacBlack & Vine (47 Broadway Market) sells vintage furniture and wine.

Other attractions include the National Trust-owned Sutton House. A rare example of a Tudor red-brick house built for the Principal Secretary of State for Henry VIII. Hackney is also home to the Hackney Empire theatre and Stoke Newington Church Street with its eclectic array of specialist shops, cafes, and ethnic restaurants.

OPENING TIMES:

The street and schoolyard markets open every Saturday between 9 am and 5 pm. Get there earlier – not long after 9 am – before it gets busy. Arriving at around 4pm isn’t advised because many of the stallholders have a tendency to start packing up early. Shops, bars, and restaurants are open throughout the week.

TRAVELLING:

Broadway Market’s nearest Tube station is London Fields on the Overground line.

Things to Do near Broadway Market

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[before-after]

london-before-after

london-before-after

Bank Junction Then and Now presented in the images above. Bank Junction is a major road junction in the City of London, the historical and financial center. It is named after the nearby Bank of England. Six streets converge on Bank Junction, where traffic is controlled by traffic lights and give-way lanes. Since May 2017, the junction has been closed to all vehicles except buses and bicycles from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Monday to Friday. Under the regulations, the junction is closed to all but buses and cyclists during weekday peak hours.

In 2016, Bank & Monument Station was named the 8th busiest tube station on the London Underground network behind stations such as Waterloo, Victoria, Kings Cross, and Liverpool Street. It was busier than stations such as Euston, Paddington, Canary Wharf, and Bond Street. Over 64 million people passed through the station which was up around 7 million more than the previous year. In 2021 a new entrance will be built to Bank, very close to Cannon Street station, and this will boost the capacity by around 40%. The works include 12 new escalators and 3 new lifts and work began on the new entrance in 2016.

The building on the right is the Royal Exchange. The original building was officially opened in 1571 by Queen Elizabeth I. Who awarded the building its royal title. The Great Fire of London destroyed the original building in 1666. The second complex was built on the site, designed by Edward Jarman, and opened in 1669. But that also burned down. The third building, which still stands, was designed by Sir William Tite in the 1840s. And one hopes that this one will not burn down anytime soon.

The Bank of England, on the left side of the old photograph, was originally designed by Sir John Soane and built between 1788 and 1833. The building in the new photograph was designed by Sir Herbert Baker and built between 1925 and 1939, partially replacing the old building. However, Sir John’s outer wall remains in place.

You can check out more Locations in my Gallery.

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